What is Metaheuristic in AI?

According to wikipedia:

In computer science and mathematical optimization, a metaheuristic is a higher-level procedure or heuristic designed to find, generate, or select a heuristic (partial search algorithm) that may provide a sufficiently good solution to an optimization problem.

So, an evolutionary algorithm that uses tabu search or simulated annealing (depending on some parameters) to move from one population to the next would be an example of a metaheuristic?

Can you elaborate/correct me please?

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[Discussion] Logical Q&A Networks

So I’ve been thinking about this for a while and it hit me today what I think is an interesting DNN design. It’s based on what OpenNARS is doing and I wonder if anyone is doing anything similar to this:

Have a RNN take natural language sentences as input and return a sentence as output. This would be trained on logical X & Y -> Z triplets, then quintuplets, etc.

Have another RNN answer​ questions true or false (on a scale) given background info X & Y -> Z? Train it on the same data but with this one it can include things like X & Y !-> Z Use it as an adversarial network to continue to train the first network. This is important because, like with NARS, logic is 2D (for them it’s frequency and confidence, for this I guess it’s soundness and validity).

Now, treat these two networks as adversarial, and the platform as a whole as genetic.

Select Phase – Pick two sentences from a database of knowledge. Crossover – Give them to network 1 and return one or more children. Score – Check that the output is valid with network 2 Mutate – Randomly invert the output some of the time.

Put the new sentence in the database.

In NARS there is a system in place for detecting sentences which are the same and letting new computations which generate that sentence add "evidence" to the claim aka frequency. Since this is natural language that would be the hard part, keeping the database from growing out of control and merging same knowledge.

I think validity might be measurable by humans or in response to an environment as an added score. Like reinforcement learning.

Are there any similar Q&A networks out there in NLP?

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Ant-hunting we will go! – Reuters


Reuters

Ant-hunting we will go!
Reuters
"I want people to look at ants differently," said Chan, a 29-year-old Uber driver and member of Ants Singapore. "Now, a lot of people still think that ants are pests, but with enough education, I can educate them that keeping ants can be safe," he told
Running with Singapore’s ant huntersMalay Mail Online

all 4 news articles »

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Could it be possible for AI to make itself, unknowing to humans?

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Theres so much data on the www. Even more, there’s a lot of bots on the web as well.

Would it be possible, for bots to clash with another bot online, and they kind of get together and make a little sentient bot baby?

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Are you ready for pop-up, shape-shifting food? Just add water.

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Fun with food: These pasta shapes were generated by immersing a 2D flat gelatin film into water. (credit: Michael Indresano Photography)

Researchers at MIT’s Tangible Media Group are exploring ways to make your dining experience interactive and fun, with food that can transform its shape by just adding water.

Think of it as edible origami or culinary performance art — flat sheets of gelatin and starch that instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, such as macaroni and rotini, or the shape of a flower.

But the researchers suggest it’s also a practical way to reduce food-shipping costs. Edible films could be stacked together, IKEA-style, and shipped to consumers, then morph into their final shape later when immersed in water.

“We did some simple calculations, such as for macaroni pasta, and even if you pack it perfectly, you still will end up with 67 percent of the volume as air,” says Wen Wang, a co-author on the paper and a former graduate student and research scientist in MIT’s Media Lab. “We thought maybe in the future our shape-changing food could be packed flat and save space.”

Programmable pasta, anyone?

At MIT, Wang and associates had been investigating the response of various materials to moisture. They started playing around with gelatin (as in Jello), a substance that naturally expands when it absorbs water. Gelatin can expand to varying degrees depending on its density — a characteristic that the team exploited in creating their shape-transforming structures.

They created a flat, two-layer film made from gelatin of two different densities. In theory, the top layer was more densely packed, so it should be able to absorb more water than the bottom layer. Sure enough, when they immersed the entire structure in water, the top layer curled over the bottom layer, forming a slowly rising arch — creative pasta.*

Culinary performance art by MIT  researchers. (left) Phytoplankton pasta salad with heirloom tomatoes and wild Sorrel. (right) Flowering pasta with west-coast foraged mushrooms
and fermented burgundy truffle. (credit: Michael Indresano Photography)

To see how their designs might be implemented in a professional kitchen, the researchers showed their engineered edibles to Matthew Delisle, the head chef of high-end Boston restaurant L’Espalier. They jointly designed two culinary creations: transparent discs of gelatin flavored with plankton and squid ink, that instantly wrap around small beads of caviar; and long fettuccini-like strips, made from two gelatins that melt at different temperatures, causing the noodles to spontaneously divide when hot broth melts away certain sections. “They had great texture and tasted pretty good,” Yao says.

DIY food 

The researchers used a laboratory 3-D printer to pattern cellulose onto films of gelatin. But they suggest users can reproduce similar effects with more common techniques such as “screen printing” in an open-access paper presented at the Association for Computing Machinery’s 2017 Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017).

They envision that their “online software can provide design instructions, and a startup company can ship the materials to your home,” Yao says.

This research was funded, in part, by the MIT Media Lab and Food + Future, a startup accelerator sponsored by Target Corporation, IDEO, and Intel.

* The team recorded the cellulose patterns and the dimensions of all of the structures they were able to produce, and also tested mechanical properties such as toughness, organizing all this data into a database. Co-authors Zhang and Cheng then built computational models of the material’s transformations, which they used to design an online interface for users to design their own edible, shape-transforming structures.“We did many lab tests and collected a database, within which you can pick different shapes, with fabrication instructions,” Wang says. “Reversibly, you can also select a basic pattern from the database and adjust the distribution or thickness, and can see how the final transformation will look.”

Tangible Media Group | Transformative Appetite


Abstract of Transformative Appetite: Shape-Changing Food Transforms from 2D to 3D by Water Interaction through Cooking

We developed a concept of transformative appetite, where edible 2D films made of common food materials (protein, cellulose or starch) can transform into 3D food during cooking. This transformation process is triggered by water adsorption, and it is strongly compatible with the ‘flat packaging’ concept for substantially reducing shipping costs and storage space. To develop these transformable foods, we performed material-based design, established a hybrid fabrication strategy, and conducted performance simulation. Users can customize food shape transformations through a pre-defined simulation platform, and then fabricate these designed patterns using additive manufacturing. Three application techniques are provided – 2D-to-3D folding, hydration-induced wrapping, and temperature-induced self-fragmentation, to present the shape, texture, and interaction with food materials. Based on this concept, several dishes were created in the kitchen, to demonstrate the futuristic dining experience through materials-based interaction design.

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Are you ready for pop-up, shape-shifting food? Just add water.

http://ift.tt/2soneTg

Fun with food: These pasta shapes were generated by immersing a 2D flat gelatin film into water. (credit: Michael Indresano Photography)

Researchers at MIT’s Tangible Media Group are exploring ways to make your dining experience interactive and fun, with food that can transform its shape by just adding water.

Think of it as edible origami or culinary performance art — flat sheets of gelatin and starch that instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, such as macaroni and rotini, or the shape of a flower.

But the researchers suggest it’s also a practical way to reduce food-shipping costs. Edible films could be stacked together, IKEA-style, and shipped to consumers, then morph into their final shape later when immersed in water.

“We did some simple calculations, such as for macaroni pasta, and even if you pack it perfectly, you still will end up with 67 percent of the volume as air,” says Wen Wang, a co-author on the paper and a former graduate student and research scientist in MIT’s Media Lab. “We thought maybe in the future our shape-changing food could be packed flat and save space.”

Programmable pasta, anyone?

At MIT, Wang and associates had been investigating the response of various materials to moisture. They started playing around with gelatin (as in Jello), a substance that naturally expands when it absorbs water. Gelatin can expand to varying degrees depending on its density — a characteristic that the team exploited in creating their shape-transforming structures.

They created a flat, two-layer film made from gelatin of two different densities. In theory, the top layer was more densely packed, so it should be able to absorb more water than the bottom layer. Sure enough, when they immersed the entire structure in water, the top layer curled over the bottom layer, forming a slowly rising arch — creative pasta.*

Culinary performance art by MIT  researchers. (left) Phytoplankton pasta salad with heirloom tomatoes and wild Sorrel. (right) Flowering pasta with west-coast foraged mushrooms
and fermented burgundy truffle. (credit: Michael Indresano Photography)

To see how their designs might be implemented in a professional kitchen, the researchers showed their engineered edibles to Matthew Delisle, the head chef of high-end Boston restaurant L’Espalier. They jointly designed two culinary creations: transparent discs of gelatin flavored with plankton and squid ink, that instantly wrap around small beads of caviar; and long fettuccini-like strips, made from two gelatins that melt at different temperatures, causing the noodles to spontaneously divide when hot broth melts away certain sections. “They had great texture and tasted pretty good,” Yao says.

The researchers used a laboratory 3-D printer to pattern cellulose onto films of gelatin. But they suggest users can reproduce similar effects with more common techniques such as “screen printing” in an open-access paper presented at the Association for Computing Machinery’s 2017 Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017).

They envision that their “online software can provide design instructions, and a startup company can ship the materials to your home,” Yao says.

This research was funded, in part, by the MIT Media Lab and Food + Future, a startup accelerator sponsored by Target Corporation, IDEO, and Intel.

* The team recorded the cellulose patterns and the dimensions of all of the structures they were able to produce, and also tested mechanical properties such as toughness, organizing all this data into a database. Co-authors Zhang and Cheng then built computational models of the material’s transformations, which they used to design an online interface for users to design their own edible, shape-transforming structures.“We did many lab tests and collected a database, within which you can pick different shapes, with fabrication instructions,” Wang says. “Reversibly, you can also select a basic pattern from the database and adjust the distribution or thickness, and can see how the final transformation will look.”

https://player.vimeo.com/video/199408741?color=a4bbd8&portrait=0
Tangible Media Group | Transformative Appetite


Abstract of Transformative Appetite: Shape-Changing Food Transforms from 2D to 3D by Water Interaction through Cooking

We developed a concept of transformative appetite, where edible 2D films made of common food materials (protein, cellulose or starch) can transform into 3D food during cooking. This transformation process is triggered by water adsorption, and it is strongly compatible with the ‘flat packaging’ concept for substantially reducing shipping costs and storage space. To develop these transformable foods, we performed material-based design, established a hybrid fabrication strategy, and conducted performance simulation. Users can customize food shape transformations through a pre-defined simulation platform, and then fabricate these designed patterns using additive manufacturing. Three application techniques are provided – 2D-to-3D folding, hydration-induced wrapping, and temperature-induced self-fragmentation, to present the shape, texture, and interaction with food materials. Based on this concept, several dishes were created in the kitchen, to demonstrate the futuristic dining experience through materials-based interaction design.

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Senior developer team looking for an opportunity

Hello everyone 🙂

We are remote team of 15 senior, mostly clojure developers looking for new opportunity. We are very informal group of geeks 🙂 We are working on some A.I. and Machine Learning projects now. Some of us are PhDs in ML and have a lot of experience with ML. We would like to find some interesting projects to work on.

Most of us are Clojure developers with PHP, Ruby and Python backgrounds but we are familiar with Amazon AWS, JS, Machine Learning, Node.Js, PHP, Angular, C# (.NET Core), C++, PostgreSQL, ReactJS, Scala, Presto, Docker, Linux and many others. We are polyglots, but we mostly work with clojure.

Ideally we are looking for some long-term cooperation, we don’t like to switch between projects too often. We are based in the Czech republic, one of us is in SF. Remote work is totally fine for us, further more we are able to travel across USA and Europe couple of times a month.

Two of us are former Scrum Masters and two Agile coaches, there’s no problem to use any agile or lean approach you’ll like. Now we are fully functioning team, but we are able to work individually as well. We are open to discuss rates and everything.

Contact me for more informations.

Thank you

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